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As mother and daughter, Carmen and Gisele Grayson thought their DNA ancestry tests would be very similar. Boy were they surprised. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

My Grandmother Was Italian. Why Aren't My Genes Italian?

Popular DNA ancestry tests don't always find what people expect. That's due to how DNA rearranges itself when egg meets sperm, and also the quirks of genetic databases.

My Grandmother Was Italian. Why Aren't My Genes Italian?

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Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart in Robbins, Ill., on Nov. 19, 2013. Dart says many suburban departments have a hard time just getting officers to patrol the town. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

What Happens When Suburban Police Departments Don't Have Enough Money?

WBEZ Chicago

Small police departments struggling with high crime and low budgets tend to pay fast-food wages, may employ officers with troubled pasts and can miss out on opportunities to learn from mistakes.

What Happens When Suburban Police Departments Don't Have Enough Money?

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'The Perfect Nanny' Is The Working Mother's Murderous Nightmare

Fresh Air

Leila Slimani's taut new novel centers on a nanny who kills her two young charges. Critic Maureen Corrigan says despite its retrograde message, The Perfect Nanny rises above its formulaic premise.

'The Perfect Nanny' Is The Working Mother's Murderous Nightmare

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Vice President Pence (left) shakes hands with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during their meeting at the prime minister's office in Jerusalem on Monday. The visit, initially scheduled for December before being postponed, is the final leg of a trip that has included talks in Egypt and Jordan as well as a stop at a U.S. military facility near the Syrian border. Ariel Schalit/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ariel Schalit/AFP/Getty Images

Pence Draws Applause, Some Heckles, For U.S. Embassy Move To Jerusalem

Israeli politicians gave standing ovations as Vice President Pence promised a faster timetable for a U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem. A Palestinian official called Pence's words "a gift to extremists."

Larry Nassar appears in court last Wednesday in Lansing, Mich., to listen to victim impact statements during his sentencing hearing. He is accused of molesting more than 100 girls while he was a physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

3 USA Gymnastics Board Members Resign, As Fallout From Abuse Scandal Continues

The resignations come during the sentencing hearing for Larry Nassar, who has admitted to sexually abusing women and girls as a doctor for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University.

The plane of the Milky Way Galaxy, which we see edge-on from our perspective on Earth. The projection used in ESO's GigaGalaxy Zoom project gives the impression of looking at the Milky Way from the outside. Serge Brunier/ESO hide caption

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Serge Brunier/ESO

Scientific Theory And The Multiverse Madness

An increasing number of theoretical physicist think that our universe is only one among infinitely many — but this speculation is not based on sound logic, says guest commentator Sabine Hossenfelder.

Shafika Khatun, 30, lives in what's known as the "widows' village" of the Hakimpara camp for Rohingya refugees in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. There are no men in the cluster of 34 shelters. Most of the women's husbands were killed in the recent violence. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

Plan To Send Rohingya Refugees Back To Myanmar Is Put On Hold

Bangladesh, which has taken in more than 650,000 refugees, had announced that it would start sending them home this week. But now the repatriation effort is on hold.

Opponents of abortion rights rallied outside the U.S. Supreme Court during The March for Life on Friday in Washington, D.C. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images

In Trump's First Year, Anti-Abortion Forces Make Strides

Kaiser Health News

Opponents of abortion have made significant progress in changing the direction of federal and state policies. The confirmation of judges favored by anti-abortion activists may be the most significant.

John Nowak / CNN Films

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Reflects On The #MeToo Movement: 'It's About Time'

"Every woman of my vintage knows what sexual harassment is, although we didn't have a name for it." Ginsburg discussed the #MeToo movement with NPR's Nina Totenberg at the Sundance Film Festival on Sunday.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Reflects On The #MeToo Movement: 'It's About Time'

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Current and former FBI officials worry damage to the bureau's reputation might make witnesses or others hesitate when dealing with special agents in the field. Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images

'Criminal Cabal'? FBI Fears Political Attacks May Imperil Work Of Field Agents

Current and former special agents worry that the bureau's tumble through the political spin cycle might hurt their ability to do their jobs across the country.

'Criminal Cabal'? FBI Fears Political Attacks May Imperil Work Of Field Agents

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Catalan separatist leader Carles Puigdemont arrives at Copenhagen Airport in Denmark on Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. On the same day, his name was put forth to return as Catalonia's president. Scanpix Denmark/Reuters hide caption

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Scanpix Denmark/Reuters

Catalonia's Puigdemont Is Put Forth For President, Despite New Calls For Arrest

Spain had rescinded its European arrest warrant when it became clear Belgian authorities would not cooperate. As a court considered a new warrant, Carles Puigdemont was proposed as Catalonia's leader.